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Camilla Persi M.A.

Persi, Camilla

Ancient Object(s) and Visual Studies (AOViS)

Ägyptologie

Adresse
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Institut für Archäologie
Archäologie und Kulturgeschichte Nordostafrikas
Unter den Linden 6
10099 Berlin

04/2022 – present
Dep. student representative in the doctoral program Ancient Objects and Visual Studies

10/2021 – present
DAAD Phd Fellow at the Berlin Graduate School of Ancient Studies (BerGSAS), Ancient Objects and Visual Studies (AOViS).

09/2018 – 10/2020
MA in Art History (with a Major in Egyptology), "La Sapienza" University of Rome

09/2018 – 07/2019
Erasmus+ at the department of Egyptology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest

09/2017 – 02/2018
Erasmus+ at the department of Art History, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest

10/2014 – 07/2018
BA in Art History (with a Major in Egyptology), "La Sapienza" University of Rome

Traineeships/Work experiences

10/2019 – 02/2020
Archives Assistant trainee at the Vatican Museums (Gregorian Egyptian Museum)

09/2019 – 01/2020
Project Assistant at "La Sapienza" University of Rome (Archaeology Department)

04/2019 – 08/2019
Content Translator at the Szépművészeti Múzeum (Budapest), Department of Egyptian Antiquities

09/2018 – 07/2019
Assistant Curator trainee at Szépművészeti Múzeum (Budapest), Department of Egyptian Antiquities

The rise of the human-headed bird: iconographical analysis of the bꜢ motif through New Kingdom funerary art

Given its importance, the concept of the bꜢ has always been studied throughout Egyptological religious studies. Nevertheless, the iconography of the bꜢ and its visual absence throughout the Old and Middle Kingdoms, as well as the seemingly random occurrence of it at the beginning of the New Kingdom, has never been fully explained. Clarifying how the bꜢ was represented (or thought of) through the Old and Middle Kingdoms still appears problematic, although attention-grabbing signs exist about the origins of the human-headed bird iconography. The research aims to analyse the spread and versatility of the bꜢ iconography during the first phase of its existence, in other words, identifying, analysing, cataloguing, as much as possible, all the applications of it in New Kingdom funerary art. Subsequently, proofing the artistic and sentimental value of the symbol itself, attempting to delineate its origins, beginning and the first part of its iconographical history.